Clydebank

In 1871, Clydebank amounted to no more than a farm. Later that year, James and George Thomas moved in and began to establish a shipyard. In 1882, the American firm of Singers built a sewing-machine factory and the last traces of rural life were swept away. In 1899, John Brown and Co from Sheffield acquired the shipyard. Among the famous vessels built there were the Lusitania, Queen Mary,Queen Elizabeth, and the QE2.

Dumbarton

Formerly Dunbreaton – Fort of the Britons – the centre of the ancient kingdom of Strathclyde, and now a Royal Burgh, the town is commanded by one of Britain’s oldest strongholds, Dumbarton Rock, rising 240ft above the Rivers Clyde and Leven. The remains of the castle  perched on the Rock include the Wallace Tower (he was imprisoned here in 1305). Alexandria, 3 miles north near the southern end of Loch Lomond.